Dual DRS Zones for all but Monaco and Suzuka

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DRS has played a significant role in deciding the outcome of  races over these couple of years and had been brought to the limelight to increase overtaking. It does a brilliant job in doing so but sometimes it makes us feel does it worth it? I’m being rational here, overtaking is meant to be a different task all together now, that is, push a driver until a designated zone where the following driver will have a given advantage to ease past the other. Some drivers will be cautioned not to mess it up until the Zone’s arrival and some hardly risk themselves to get alongside even though their car is fast enough.

Yet it won’t be an easy task for drivers to get it right but sometimes it’s less dramatic. Downforce setups depend solely on race strategies and in which position the car is up on the grid. DRS also will be considered in that. One of the minor yet impacting rule tweaks for this season is that the cars are not allowed to use the Drag Reduction System other than the restricted zones in any part of the race weekend. This has been brought in as concerns raised over driver safety while the DRS-wing is deployed. As for me, the change shouldn’t have come along.

In the Practice and Qualifying, teams had to work their way to find an optimum balance between Qualy and Race setup with also factoring the DRS system. The amount of ride height, angle of attack, size of the rear wing elements act as decisive factors in organising the setup. During Practice sessions, even the slightest of errors will get punished once a driver doesn’t pull the DRS switch at the right moment, for instance, if it happens before the end of a corner he will be destined to lose the car completely and end up on the wayside.

It won’t be the case now as DRS can be used only through the allotted areas in Qualifying as well. Considering safety though it is a move step that’s been welcomed. The likes of Mercedes, who pioneered Active DRS system by stalling the front of the car and tried to perfect it the whole season, has to stick with other plans as this rule change along with Active DRS being effectively outlawed for this season.

Many outfits have tried to exploit ‘Passive DRS System’ in testing and it would pave the way for an interesting turnaround as the development race rolls on in due course. For this season, almost all tracks will have a couple of DRS zones at their disposal – barring the streets of Monaco and the fast and fluid Suzuka. The races at Albert Park, Monza, BIC and Yas Marina Circuits will retain dual DRS zones from 2012 with no modifications. The Circuit Gilles Villeneuve will be available with its 2011 configuration of two Zones, one at pit and other at final straights. Interlagos, COTA, Marina Bay, Shanghai, Spa, Korea and Nurburgring circuits will have respective pit straights added to the zones from last year to make it two each.

Here is the full-table:

Track 2012 zones 2013  Modifications  
Australian GP – Albert Park Pit straight and second straight Pit straight and second straight
Malaysian GP – Sepang International Circuit Pit straight Pit straight and final straight
Chinese GP – Shanghai International Circuit Longest straight Longest straight and pit straight
Bahrain GP – Bahrain International Circuit Pit straight Pit straight and straight to turn 11
Spanish GP – Circuit de Catalunya Pit straight Pit straight and straight to turn ten
Monaco GP – Monte-Carlo Pit straight Pit straight
Canadian GP – Circuit Gilles Villeneuve Pit straight Pit straight and final straight
British GP – Silverstone Wellington straight Wellington straight and Hangar straight
German GP – Nurburgring Straight before chicane Pit straight and straight before chicane
Hungarian GP – Hungaroring Pit straight Pit straight and second straight
Belgian GP – Spa-Francorchamps Kemmel straight Kemmel straight and pit straight
Italian GP – Monza Pit straight and straight to Ascari Pit straight and straight to Ascari
Singapore GP – Marina Bay Street Circuit Straight to turn seven Straight to turn seven and pit straight
Korean GP – Korean International Circuit Longest straight Longest straight and pit straight
Japanese GP – Suzuka Pit straight Pit straight
Indian GP – Buddh International Circuit Pit straight and longest straight Pit straight and longest straight
Abu Dhabi GP – Yas Marina circuit Two longest straights Two longest straights
United States GP – Circuit of the Americas Longest straight Longest straight and pit straight
Brazilian GP – Interlagos Reta Oposta straight Reta Oposta straight and pit straight
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One thought on “Dual DRS Zones for all but Monaco and Suzuka

  1. I will have to remember this one as it has the DRS zones listed…seems I am never quite sure where they are. I know some that are not fans of Formula 1 and cannot understand the DRS zone and why it cannot be used by the leading driver to defend his spot. One only needs to look at other forms of racing that allows blocking to see that the DRS is a much safer alternative. As for how many passes are made in a race, it is much more exciting to see one good pass then many passes.that have no value to the race. Safety should always come first, good racing is sure to follow and this seems like a great start! Now I will finally know where the DRS Zones are at each track!

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